Strategies for Learning and Teaching

  • Allow extra time for completion of tasks.
  • Remove clutter from classrooms or access areas to reduce the risk of falling.
  • Remember that students may need to catch up on missed work due to periods of hospitalisation. If possible liaise with parents/carers in this regard.
  • It may be necessary for the student to experiment with different types of pen and paper.
  • Participation in games, Physical Education and other physical activities will be difficult and tasks will have to be modified. Perhaps use lighter bats and balls, foam javelins, etc.
  • Photo of a woman hugging a boy who is upset.Consult with the occupational therapist with regard to the most suitable type of seating and desk for the student.
  • Aids for mobility may be required.
  • Aids for writing may have to be utilised.
  • As writing will perhaps be slow for the student, handouts of notes will be helpful.
  • Schedule study buddies to help students to organise learning materials, while also remembering to promote students’ independence as much as possible.
  • Consider using assistive technology.
  • If students are mobile, arrangements need to be made to minimise the risk of being bumped into or knocked over (e.g. the student may have to wait until peers have left the classroom before he/she leaves).
  • If students use wheelchairs, where possible place yourself at their eyelevel when talking to them.
  • Table-type desks with adequate leg space may need to be considered if the student has a wheelchair.
  • The black/white board in the classroom may have to be lowered if the student is in a wheelchair.
  • To facilitate students’ reading, use easels, portable reading racks or adjustable desks.